Home Ideas & inspiration When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

by Mary Ivanova

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Fonts is a challenging topic for any non-designer – many articles on the topic are targeted at professional designers and can be very confusing. Every font is “spacey”, “antique”, “elegant” or “chunky” – which are the descriptives helpful to a professional actually familiar with font groups and families, but not to a newbie just trying to figure out how to pick the second font for their subheadline. Let’s take a look at a few pretty basic and simple fonts that are suitable for almost any occasion.

I started by looking through the handy Google Font directory where you can search the fonts in categories (serif, sans, display, handwriting, monospace), filter by thickness, slant, width and more. To find universal fonts one can use for any purpose, I decided to sort the fonts by popularity – the more people use them, the more likely it is that they will fit more purposes.

Here are the top fonts in my results: Roboto, Open Sans, Lato, and Montserrat.

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Let’s see how we can use them in Crello templates for social, ads and print.

I took a Crello Blog Image template that already had a Roboto font set as default for one of the text boxes and tried applying the remaining three fonts – Open Sans, Lato, and Montserrat, – to see how they would fit. This is my result:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Go to template

Roboto is a geometric font with nicely spaced out individual letters and a pleasant, rounded feel without becoming too curvy to be comfortably readable:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

 

Open Sans is often described as “neutral but friendly”, which is probably the reason it’s one of the most popular fonts around:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Classical proportions combined with sans serif style make Lato a font that seems timeless and modern at the same time. The font’s designer Łukasz Dziedzic refers to the font as one that conveys the feeling of summer (hence the name “Lato” means “Summer” in Polish):

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Montserrat started as an attempt to rescue urban typography – the font conveys the nostalgic classical beauty of old city posters and signs:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

After I was done looking at Google Fonts’ most popular typefaces, I turned to Crello marketing designers to help me pick out a few more fonts that would go well with virtually any template. Being designers, their first response was, of course, that there’s no such thing as a universal font one can just randomly use anywhere. Nonetheless, I did not leave the meeting empty-handed.

Here are the fonts they came up with: Assistant, Blogger, Economica, Frank Ruhl Libre, and Merriweather. Let’s take a closer look at each.

Assistant is a contemporary take at a simple rounded sans serif design. It’s great for longer texts as it manages to keep them readable yet condensed:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

The very name of the Blogger font gives away its primarily design purpose – for web use:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Tight and elongated, but still comfortably readable, Economica is a great font for headlines and designs with shorter copy:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Frank Ruhl Libre combines an antique feel with smooth lines and less contrast in font line thickness.

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Merriweather is a functional multi-purpose typeface, developed specifically for screens as it remains readable even when the image or text are viewed on a phone. It fits glam, business and nature designs flawlessly:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

Now, to round up the list to ten, how about we try uploading a font to Crello? That’s right, you can upload any fonts in .ttf and .otf formats and use them in Crello. Whether it’s your custom brand font or a licensed font you want to add to your design, you can upload it to Crello and add to any design.

Where to find free fonts online and how to use them in Crello

To get my font, I went to 1001freefonts to search for fonts in the public domain. Vollkorn caught my eye with its classic look and generous spacing. I downloaded the file and added it to Crello by going to My Files > Fonts and hitting Upload Font button. All your uploaded fonts are featured at the very top of your font menu:

When In Doubt, Use These Fonts

In conclusion

When you want to change up the preset fonts in a template you are using, first try a few fonts that have similar typeface to the default ones. If you really want to be experimental, go with fonts that have good readability, convey the mood and tone of your message, as well as fit well with the images and colors of your design.

When in doubt, using a classic neutral font is always your best bet. For more on fonts, read our typography crash course and explore the font pairing for beginners guide.

Related Posts